Recipe: Chocolate and chestnut roulade

We are not traditionalists when it comes to the menu at Christmas and that includes the pudding. For the Kenwood Christmas menu we’re moving from a spot of festive baking with Lebkuchen to thinking about the pud.

I don’t like the traditional Christmas pudding. In fact, none of us do though we always have a small one in the cupboard because, seemingly, we think we should. Last year saw me making a Mont Blanc and this year is just a step across from that with a chocolate and chestnut roulade gracing our table.

chocolate and chestnut roulade

Chestnut puree is becoming increasingly easy to get hold of, I picked mine up in Sainsbury’s, and it is a much more versatile ingredient than you may first think if you’ve never used it before. Though, to be frank, it looks fairly unappetising in the tin! You can buy both sweetened and unsweetened puree so do check which one you’re picking up. I tend to buy the unsweetened as the remainder of the tin then has more scope than its sweetened counterpart.

Making a roulade is one of those things that I always think sounds like more hard work that it actually is. True, it does help if you have some form of electric mixer – hand whisking the 6 egg whites would be a little daunting – but once everything is whisked and the roulade cooked it becomes more of an assembly job than anything.

Rolling the roulade requires a deep breath and a bit of faith. Plus the acceptance that it will crack and split a little but that it just adds to its charm. And let’s face it, a dusting of icing sugar hides a multitude of sins.

chocolate and chestnut roulade

The absence of flour in the roulade makes this a good gluten free option and though a rich and decadent pudding it is lighter than the traditional offering.

As with last time, you can catch up with what Karen, Beth, Eliza and Becs are up to in the links below.

Chocolate and chestnut roulade

Serving Size: 8, depending on the generosity of your slices!

An alternative to the traditional Christmas pudding. Rich and chocolaty with a chestnut cream filling, this also gives a gluten free option.

Ingredients

  • 6 eggs, separated
  • 175g caster sugar, plus extra for sprinkling
  • 175g dark chocolate, melted and left to cool slightly
  • 300ml double cream
  • 6 tbsp chestnut puree
  • 2 tbsp icing sugar, plus extra for dusting

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 160c fan and line a Swiss roll tin with greaseproof paper.
  2. Whisk the egg yolks and sugar together in a bowl until pale and thick and then whisk in the cooled, melted chocolate. Whisk the egg whites until they reach a soft peak. This stage is a lot easier with a stand mixer or an electric whisk.
  3. Add a spoonful of egg whites to the chocolate mix and mix to loosen it. Fold in the rest of the egg whites with a metal spoon to retain as much air as possible. It is easier to do this a couple of spoonfuls at a time.
  4. Pour the mixture in to the Swiss roll tin and bake for 20-25 minutes until the roulade springs back to the touch.
  5. Meanwhile, cut another piece of greaseproof paper slightly larger than the Swiss roll tin and lay it on the counter. Sprinkle it with extra caster sugar.
  6. Once the roulade is ready, remove from the oven and flip on to the sugared paper. Gently peel off the upper layer of greaseproof paper and leave to cool.
  7. Whip the cream until it retains its shape. Mix the chestnut puree and icing sugar together then gently mix into the whipped cream.
  8. Spread the chestnut cream on to the cooled roulade, leaving a small gap around the edges. Roll the roulade up as tightly as you can starting at one long side, using the greaseproof paper to help you guide it. Once rolled, slide on to a plate, ensuring that the ends are underneath. Dust with icing sugar.

Notes

Don’t worry if the roulade cracks as you roll it, the chances are that it will. This adds to its charms and a multitude of sins can be covered with icing sugar!

http://fishfingersfortea.co.uk/2012/11/26/chocolate-and-chestnut-roulade/

This is a sponsored post, in association with Kenwood. In return for creating a Christmas menu, along with 4 other bloggers, I received a Kenwood Titanium Chef.

  • http://twitter.com/KarenBurnsBooth @Lavender and Lovage

    That looks fabulous Sian and I always hope that my roulades have a few little cracks in them, as I think it adds to the charm of the pudding, as you said. I am an absolute convert to chestnut puree and when I am in France, I stock up on tins of it to bring back to the UK! A fabulous festive pud and I for one would be back for seconds. Karen

    • http://fishfingersfortea.co.uk/ Fishfingers for tea

      Thanks Karen! Chestnut puree is great isn’t it! It’s something that I’ve only really used in the last couple of years but I think it’s worth exploring what it can do.

  • Laura@howtocookgoodfood

    Gorgeous roulade. Always goes down well and makes a great alternative if you are not a Christmas pud fan. I on the other hand love my Xmas pud, mince pies and cake. I may be tempted by your chestnut flavoured cream though!

    • http://fishfingersfortea.co.uk/ Fishfingers for tea

      Thanks Laura. I love mince pies, I think it’s just the heaviness of the pudding that puts me off.

  • http://twitter.com/laythetable Becs @ Lay the table

    Looks beautiful. I’ve never actually made a roulade though you made it sound easy! I do remember learning swiss roll in home economics and that wasn’t too tough…

    • http://fishfingersfortea.co.uk/ Fishfingers for tea

      Thanks Becs. The rolling technique is the same so you should be fine, just take a deep breath and roll it up!

  • Camilla @Fabfood4all

    No-one except me will eat Christmas pud but I always find it far too heavy anyway on the day, your roulade is a perfect replacement and I would add a few fresh strawberries, well it would make me feel less guilty!

    • http://fishfingersfortea.co.uk/ Fishfingers for tea

      If you add fruit it magically removes all fat and calories from anything!

  • http://twitter.com/ritacooksitalia Rita cooks Italian

    I love your roulade Sian! I actually like the cracks (it looks like old wood!!). I’ve never tried chestnut puree’, it sounds an interesting ingredient!!

    • http://fishfingersfortea.co.uk/ Fishfingers for tea

      Thank you Rita! If you spot chestnut puree then grab some, especially if it’s the unsweetened version. It’s really quite versatile.

  • Cooking with Real Ingredients

    Looks beautiful. Where on earth do you get chestnut puree from?

    • http://fishfingersfortea.co.uk/ Fishfingers for tea

      Thank you! I picked mine up in Sainsbury’s but I also think Waitrose stock it.